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Le peigne d'Almain

What is the relationship between us and the Almain comb?

None!

Rabelais said of Gargantua that he brushed his hair with “Almain comb”, i.e. with his “four fingers and thumb”.

This humorous jibe was a dig at Jacques Almain, a renowned theologian of the time. He was also the National Prosecutor of France.

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The lost statue of Claude Chappe

The firm is located at the crossroads of boulevards Saint-Germain, Raspail and Rue du Bac. Between 1893 and 1942, this crossroads was dominated by an imposing bronze statue of Claude Chappe and his aerial telegraph, as shown in several pre-war postcards. This statue, which was melted during the Second World War, has never been replaced.

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From Pont Royal to Almain, a walk in Rue du Bac

Rue du Bac owes its name to a ferry (bac meaning ferry in French) that went across the River Seine, at the site of today's Pont Royal, in the middle of the 16th century. During the construction of the Tuileries, the ferry carried stone blocks extracted from Paris quarries in the South. They arrived in trailers which bypassed Paris by the Faubourg Saint-Germain. During a walk, Louis XIII witnessed a major accident of the Tuileries ferry and decided to replace it by a wooden toll-bridge called the Pont Rouge, due to its colour. The fragile bridge was rebuilt several times and was finally replaced in 1689 by a stone bridge, the Pont Royal. (Learn more)

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